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9/30/15news article

new neurosurgeon will use advanced imaging to unlock secrets of the brain and spine

Many parents would love to know what goes on in their kid’s mind. For example, what could she possibly have been thinking when she put gum in her hair? Where did he get the crazy idea to mattress dive off the top bunk?

While no one may ever be able to answer those questions, Robert Lober, MD, PhD, hopes to unlock some of the secrets of a child’s brain and spinal cord to provide great care for them and even better care for the next child. Dr. Lober joins Dayton Children’s neurosurgery department, and as part of his role, he will also conduct pediatric research in our partnership with the Wright State University & Premier Health Neuroscience Institute.

“We are pioneering the most advanced clinical neuroimaging technologies available in Ohio, including specialized vascular and spinal imaging techniques that are being developed through a joint collaboration with Stanford University,” says Dr. Lober. “In this field, we are on the verge of many exciting medical discoveries that promise to improve the lives of patients in ways that we could not have previously imagined.”

Dr. Lober plans to create a neuroimaging laboratory that will analyze the massive amounts of data from the medical imaging scans of Dayton Children’s patients, as well as experimental subjects, to guide protocols and better care for the next patients. The recent addition of the 3T MRI at Dayton Children’s, with twice the quality and clarity of most current scanners, will help him in this research. He will work with researchers, physicists and clinicians from around the country to find ways to revolutionize treatment options. Along with advanced imaging, he has special interests in neuro-oncology, hydrocephalus and epilepsy.

Coming from Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital in in Palo Alto, California, Dr. Lober completed a fellowship in pediatric neurosurgery and pediatric neuro-oncology, a rare combination for a pediatric surgeon. He served his residency at Stanford Hospitals and Clinics in Stanford, California. He earned his medical degree and a PhD in Biomedical science at Georgia Regents University in Augusta, Georgia.

“At Dayton Children’s, there is a unique opportunity to provide highly personalized care in a more efficient and cost-effective manner compared to large academic centers,” says Dr. Lober. “Patients receive world-class care from experts recruited from top centers, who wished to have a smaller practice that allows a close relationship between doctors, patients and their families.”

The neurosurgery team at Dayton Children’s Hospital provides specialized, multidisciplinary care for children with conditions affecting the brain, spinal cord and peripheral nerves. The neurosurgeons take a conservative approach, pursuing non-surgical and minimally invasive techniques whenever possible, using the most advanced endoscopic procedures, laser technology and high-frequency ultrasound. This allows for faster healing, less pain, less scarring and quicker recovery. In addition, Dayton Children’s has pediatric anesthesiologists, the only ones in the region trained to safely sedate children, as well as surgical suites specifically designed with child-sized equipment and tools.

Dayton Children’s is continually expanding neuroscience capabilities. The hospital recently created a designated neuroscience unit, dedicated to patients admitted under neurology/neurosurgery service, as well as patients undergoing video-EEG studies in the epilepsy monitoring unit. The staff in this unit is specifically trained on neurological and neurosurgical conditions including headaches, epilepsy, ketogenic diet, as well as post-operative care.

For more information, contact:
Stacy Porter
Communications specialist
Phone: 937-341-3666
newsroom@childrensdayton.org

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Rob Lober, MD, PhD, FAANS

neurosurgery
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