Choosing Safe Baby Products: Infant Seats & Child Safety Seats

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Infant Seats

Infant seats should not be confused with infant or child safety seats (car seats). Regular infant seats simply allow young babies to sit up. They're not designed to protect a baby in a crash and should never be used to transport infants. Some child safety seats, however, can double as infant seats.

What to look for:

  • The base should be wider than the seat, and locking mechanisms should be secure. Push down on the unit to make sure it is sturdy.
  • The base should feature nonskid surfacing to prevent the seat from moving on a smooth surface.
  • The seat belt should be secure and the fabric should be washable.
  • If wire supporting devices snap on the back of the seat, make sure they are secure so that they do not pop out and cause the seat to collapse.

SAFETY NOTES:

  • Never place your baby in an infant seat on a table or other elevated surface from which your child could fall, or on the washing machine or any other vibrating surface (the vibrations could cause the seat to move and fall).
  • Use the seat belt every time you place your baby in the seat.
  • Avoid placing the seat on soft surfaces such as beds or sofas because it may tip over and the baby could suffocate.

Child Safety Seats (Car Seats)

More children are seriously injured or killed in auto accidents than in any other type of accident. Using a child safety seat is the best protection you can give your child when traveling by car.

Never substitute any type of infant seat for a child safety seat. Only child safety seats — properly installed in the back seat — are designed to protect a child from injury during a car accident.

What to look for:

  • Choose a seat with a label that states it meets or exceeds Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 213.
  • Accept a used seat with caution. Never accept a seat that's more than 6 years old or one that was in a crash (even if it looks OK, it could be structurally unsound). Avoid seats that are missing parts or are not labeled with the manufacture date and model number (you'll have no way to know about recalls). Also, check the seat for the manufacturer's recommended "expiration date." If you have any doubts about the seat's history, or if it is cracked or shows signs of wear and tear, don't use it.
  • Be sure that the seat you choose fits your child — a smaller baby can slip out of a seat that's too large.
  • Consider choosing a seat that's upholstered in fabric — it may be more comfortable for your child.

SAFETY NOTES:

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that infants and toddlers ride in a rear-facing seat until they are 2 years old or until they have reached the maximum weight and height limits recommended by the manufacturer.

Once kids are ready to transition to a forward-facing seat, they should be harnessed in until they reach the maximum weight or height for that seat. When they have outgrown their forward-facing harnessed seat, they need to be placed in a booster seat.

For more information on proper installation of child safety seats and how to harness your child, read our article on auto safety. You also can call the Department of Transportation Auto Safety Hotline — (888) DASH-2-DOT — if you have questions.

Reviewed by: Elana Pearl Ben-Joseph, MD
Date reviewed: April 2011



Related Resources

OrganizationU.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) This federal agency collects information about consumer goods and issues recalls on unsafe or dangerous products.
OrganizationNational Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) NHTSA is the government agency responsible for ensuring and improving automobile and traffic safety.
OrganizationAmerican Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) The AAP is committed to the health and well-being of infants, adolescents, and young adults. The website offers news articles and tips on health for families.


Related Articles

Household Safety Checklists Young kids love to explore their homes, but are unaware of the potential dangers. Learn how to protect them with our handy household safety checklists.
Childproofing and Preventing Household Accidents You might think of babies and toddlers when you hear the words "babyproofing" or "childproofing," but unintentional injury is the leading cause of death in kids 14 years old and under.
Booster Seat Safety Your tot's not a baby anymore! It's time for a big-kid booster seat. But how can you ensure that your child is still safe and secure in the car? Find out here.
Car Seat Safety What's the proper way to install an infant safety seat? Is your toddler ready for a forward-facing seat? Get the car seat know-how you need here.
Choosing Safe Baby Products Choosing baby products can be confusing, but one consideration must never be compromised: your little one's safety.
Auto Safety More kids are injured in auto collisions than in any other type of accident, but you can protect them by learning the proper use of car seats and booster seats.
Road Rules for Little Passengers Use these tips to teach your kids how to stay safe when riding in a car or on a school bus.




Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

© 1995-2012 The Nemours Foundation/KidsHealth. All rights reserved.



 

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