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orthopaedics services and programs

Our pediatric orthopaedic specialists work closely with other experts at Dayton Children’s to ensure that each child’s unique needs are met. These can include experts in developmental medicine, sports medicine, radiology and many other specialty areas. We offer a wide variety of programs and services to fit any need. Learn more about our services and programs below.

surgery

Most orthopaedic surgeries are performed on an outpatient basis, meaning that the patient goes home the same day. Some complex procedures, however, require a hospital stay. These can include surgeries to correct scoliosis or a traumatic injury, for example. Learn more.

sports medicine

The Dayton Children’s sports medicine center is a great resource for kids who have experienced a sports-related injury. Our team of certified, sports medicine trained specialists knows how such injuries affect young bodies and growth. They are committed to getting athletes back to the activities they enjoy as quickly and safely as possible. Appointments are available on our main and south campuses. Learn more about Dayton Children’s sports medicine.

orthopaedic rehabilitation

Our patients undergo therapy with physical therapists who are specialty trained in pediatric rehabilitation. Sometimes, we recommend that patients see a physical therapist in another Dayton Children’s department who has expertise in a specific area. This is often the case for very young patients and those with neurological diagnoses, such as cerebral palsy. Learn more about the orthopaedic rehab difference.

spine

Our spine program provides evaluation and treatment to children from birth to 21 with spinal deformities, trauma-related spinal conditions, benign and malignant musculoskeletal tumors, genetic cervical spine conditions and other conditions that affect the spine. Learn more.

scoliosis and scoliosis screening program

Dayton Children's scoliosis screening program primarily targets sixth through eighth graders but will occasionally screen in other grades as well. In 90 percent of diagnosed scoliosis cases, curves are mild and do not require active treatment, but should be monitored for change. In those that require treatment, modern bracing can be used on the majority of them to prevent progression and the need for surgery. When a child does meet the requirement and are cleared for surgery they will be treated by the orthopedics team at Dayton Children’s. Learn more

neuromuscular and syndromic disorders

Our team also cares for children who have orthopaedic conditions related to cerebral palsy or myelomeningocele (spina bifida) or down syndrome. When these patients come to the hospital for a check-up with their primary specialist at Dayton Children’s, one of our physicians can be available during that appointment to address any orthopaedic concerns. These patients also can make a separate appointment at one of our orthopaedic clinics.

fracture care

All of our pediatric orthopaedic fracture clinics offer complete casting services and on-site crutch training. We treat thousands of fractures a year. Learn more

hand care

Our congenital and pediatric hand care team treats hand, wrist and elbow trauma, fractures, tendon and nerve injuries, and congenital hand conditions such as radial club hand, polydactyly (extra finger) and syndactyly (joined fingers).

The team is composed of specialists in hand surgery, physical medicine and rehabilitation, neurology, pain management, and occupational and hand therapy.

limb lengthening

Children who are born with—or who develop—differences in the length of their limbs can benefit from a range of treatments that may be as simple as the use of adaptive footwear or as sophisticated as limb lengthening surgical intervention that helps generate new bone in the affected limb. When limb lengthening surgery is indicated, orthopedic surgeons can safely and gradually lengthen the affected bone by up to 15 to 20 centimeters.

To initiate limb lengthening, the orthopedic surgeon typically performs an osteotomy, a procedure in which a small incision is made in the metaphysis, a section of the bone that has the greatest metabolic turnover, and therefore yields the fastest formation of new bone tissue. External fixators are placed with pins and wires along the affected bone to set the stage for the next part of the process, distraction osteogenesis. During surgery, great care is taken to protect both soft tissue and the blood supply to the bone.

However, new technics using magnets result in a less invasive process for lengthening. Our surgeons now use adjustable intramedullary nail incorporating remote control technology using magnets which eliminates the need for an external fixation frame or external fixator for older patients. Therefore, we can reduce the rate of infections and complications that are commonly caused by external fixation frames.

hip program

The hip program provides comprehensive care for children and young adults with hip deformities and injuries. Abnormalities in the hip joint can cause early and lifelong problems often leading to early hip replacement. The goal of the hip program is to restore normal anatomy to the hip joint and prevent or significantly delay the need for hip replacement. We employ the latest diagnostic, therapeutic and surgical techniques to ensure the best care for your child.

Our specialties include:

  • Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI)
  • Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE)
  • Hip Dysplasia (DDH)
  • Leg-Calve-Perthes Disease
  • Avascular Necrosis
  • Coxa Vara
  • Snapping hip
  • Hip pain
  • Congenital hip deformity
  • Sports injuries
contact us request an appointment

The orthopaedics department welcomes phone calls to 937- 641-3010 during our normal business hours of 8:00 am to 5:00 pm Monday-Friday.

Appointments are available without a physician referral. Call 937-641-3010 to schedule your visit.