Media Release: Five reasons to vaccinate your child

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Vaccines protect children from 14 vaccine-preventable diseases before age two

Five reasons to vaccinate your child

04-18-2013 (Dayton, OH) -

Each year, thousands of children become ill from diseases that could have been prevented by basic childhood immunizations. Countless more miss time from day care and school because they are under-immunized or inappropriately immunized.

During the week of April 20 – 27, 2013, Dayton Children’s will observe National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW), a Center for Disease Control and Prevention initiative designed to raise awareness about the importance of childhood immunizations.

“While vaccines are given throughout childhood, it is vital that immunizations for babies under the age of 12 months are up to date so that they can be ‘done by one,’” says Sherman Alter, MD medical director of infectious disease at Dayton Children’s.

According to the CDC, vaccines are among the most successful and cost-effective public health tools available for preventing disease and death. Thanks to vaccines, infants and children are protected from 14 vaccine-preventable diseases before age two.

The CDC offers many great tools to help parents keep up with their child’s vaccinations. This includes their “make your own schedule” tool which allows parents to type in their child’s birth date to automatically generate an immunization schedule for that child. Click here to view the schedule tool. 

Five reasons to vaccinate your child

  1. Immunizations can save your child’s life.Because of advances in medical science, your child can be protected against more diseases than ever before. Some diseases that once injured or killed thousands of children, have been eliminated completely and others are close to extinction– primarily due to safe and effective vaccines. One example of the great impact that vaccines can have is the elimination of polio in the United States. Polio was once America’s most-feared disease, causing death and paralysis across the country, but today, thanks to vaccination, there are no reports of polio in the United States.
  2. Vaccination is very safe and effective. Vaccines are only given to children after a long and careful review by scientists, doctors, and healthcare professionals. Vaccines will involve some discomfort and may cause pain, redness, or tenderness at the site of injection but this is minimal compared to the pain, discomfort, and trauma of the diseases these vaccines prevent. Serious side effects following vaccination, such as severe allergic reaction, are very rare. The disease-prevention benefits of getting vaccines are much greater than the possible side effects for almost all children.
  3. Immunization protects others you care about.Children in the U.S. still get vaccine-preventable diseases. In fact, we have seen resurgences of measles and whooping cough (pertussis) over the past few years. In 2010 the U.S. had over 21,000 cases of whooping cough reported and 26 deaths, most in children younger than 6 months. Unfortunately, some babies are too young to be completely vaccinated and some people may not be able to receive certain vaccinations due to severe allergies, weakened immune systems from conditions like leukemia, or other reasons. To help keep them safe, it is important that you and your children who are able to get vaccinated are fully immunized.  This not only protects your family, but also helps prevent the spread of these diseases to your friends and loved ones.
  4. Immunizations can save your family time and money.A child with a vaccine-preventable disease can be denied attendance at schools or daycare facilities. Some vaccine-preventable diseases can result in prolonged disabilities and can take a financial toll because of lost time at work, medical bills or long-term disability care. In contrast, getting vaccinated against these diseases is a good investment and usually covered by insurance. The Vaccines for Children program is a federally funded program that provides vaccines at no cost to children from low-income families. To find out more about the VFC program, visit http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/programs/vfc/or ask your child’s health care professional.
  5. Immunization protects future generations.Vaccines have reduced and, in some cases, eliminated many diseases that killed or severely disabled people just a few generations ago. For example, smallpox vaccination eradicated that disease worldwide. Your children don’t have to get smallpox shots any more because the disease no longer exists. By vaccinating children against rubella (German measles), the risk that pregnant women will pass this virus on to their fetus or newborn has been dramatically decreased, and birth defects associated with that virus no longer are seen in the United States. If we continue vaccinating now, and vaccinating completely, parents in the future may be able to trust that some diseases of today will no longer be around to harm their children in the future.

Related information:

For more information, contact:
Grace Rodney
Marketing Communications Specialist
Phone: 937-641-3666
marketing@childrensdayton.org

 

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