MyPlate Food Guide

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Parents

Lea este articuloThe U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) created MyPlate, an easy-to-follow food guide, to help parents to figure out how to feed their kids nutritious, balanced meals.

The colorful divided plate includes sections for vegetables, fruits, grains, and foods high in protein. It's an improvement upon the complex and confusing MyPyramid that the USDA once used to explain its dietary guidelines.

Old Pyramid New Plate

With MyPlate, forget about measuring out serving sizes and trying to remember whether a piece a chicken should be the size of a fist or a golf ball. MyPlate's user-friendly, interactive website provides simple messages that are easy to understand, such as:

  • fill half your child's plate with vegetables and fruits
  • make at least half the grains you serve whole grains, like oatmeal and brown rice
  • serve fat-free or low-fat (1%) milk and water rather than sugary drinks
  • when buying pre-packaged foods, choose ones that are low in sodium
  • don't serve oversized portions

Here's more about how to get MyPlate onto your table:

From Pyramid to Plate: What Changed?

MyPyramid represented the five food groups plus oils with six colorful vertical stripes. The stripes were thicker or thinner depending on how much of one food group should be consumed. Steps on the left side of the pyramid reminded people to stay active each day.

At first glance, it was difficult to tell how much of each food group should be in a healthy diet. That's where MyPlate really makes meal planning easier. Just by looking at the icon, you know right away that vegetables and fruits should take up half the plate (with the veggie portion being a bit bigger), and grains and protein foods should take up the other half (with more grains on this side). And with a side helping of dairy, you're reminded to include milk or another dairy food (like cheese or yogurt) in your daily meal plan.

Because MyPlate is a divided plate, no one food group overpowers the others. That's because dietary guidelines encourage eating a variety of foods and discourage "super-sized" portions, which can lead to weight gain and obesity.

Although the food guide icon has changed, the USDA's message about eating well has stayed the same. Kids still need to eat lots of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, along with lean meats or other forms of protein and low-fat dairy products.

Oils provide important nutrients and are recommended in small amounts but aren't included on the MyPlate icon. Choose oils over solid fats, but limit the amount you eat.

Exercise is no longer included in the icon, but it's still an important component of a healthy lifestyle. Starting when they're 2 years old, kids need at least 60 minutes of moderate to physical activity each day.

How to Make MyPlate Yours

Once you get the concept of MyPlate down, you might be wondering: Do I have to serve all the food groups at each meal? And what about breakfast? Do I really have to give my kids veggies for breakfast? After all, it might be hard enough to get them to eat them at lunch or dinner.

No, you don't, but do aim to serve a variety of food groups at each meal. Use the plate as a guide when planning and serving meals. And if breakfast or lunch doesn't include a veggie or fruit, serve one of those at snack time (yes, portion-controlled snacks are still a good idea!).

The goal is to think of the plate as an entire day's worth of eating: so, throughout the day, try to make half of what your kids eat vegetables and fruits, and the other half grains and protein foods. An occasional treat is fine, but be careful to limit foods that are high in calories and low in nutrients.

If you're thinking it might be difficult to get your kids to take a bite off this new plate, practice what you preach. MyPlate is not just for kids, but for adults, too. Kids who see their parents eating better are more likely to do so themselves.

Green = Vegetables

The vegetable portion of MyPlate, in green, is one of the largest portions on the plate. That's because, just like grandma said, it's important to "eat your veggies!"

Vegetables provide many of the vitamins and minerals kids need for good health, are naturally low in calories, and contain fiber. The vegetable group is divided into five subgroups based on their nutrients:

  1. dark green vegetables (like broccoli, spinach, and kale)
  2. orange and red vegetables (like squash, carrots, and sweet potatoes)
  3. beans and peas (like kidney beans, lentils, and black-eyed peas — also included in the protein group)
  4. starchy vegetables (like corn, potatoes, and plantains)
  5. other vegetables (those that don't fall into a particular nutritional category, like artichokes and avocado)

For best nutritional value, serve a variety of vegetables to your family each week. Vegetables can be prepared and served in any number of ways and you can use fresh, frozen, dried/dehydrated, or canned veggies.

Red = Fruits

Fruits take up a slightly smaller portion of the plate than vegetables, but they're still an important part of a diet. They contain necessary nutrients like vitamin C, potassium, and fiber. Great choices include oranges, peaches, mangoes, strawberries, and apples.

Serve fruit a variety of ways: whole, cut up, in smoothies. When buying canned fruit, choose fruit that is packed in juice rather than heavy or light syrup. And it's best to serve whole fruit over 100% fruit juice, as some nutrients are lost in the juicing process.

Orange = Grains

The grain group includes any food made from wheat, oats, cornmeal, barley, or other grain. Bread, tortillas, cereal, rice, and pasta belong in this group.

At least half of the grains kids eat each day should be whole grains, such as oatmeal, brown rice, and whole wheat. Whole grains have dietary fiber that helps you feel full and protects against constipation. Eating a diet rich in whole grains also might decrease the risk of developing heart disease and diabetes.

Whole grains are different from refined grains, such as those in white bread and white rice, which have been processed and had many of their nutrients removed. Most refined grains are enriched, which means that nutrients, except fiber, are added back after processing.

Purple = Protein Foods

Foods that are high in protein help the body build, maintain, and repair tissue. They also have nutrients that are necessary to the body, like B vitamins and iron.

Protein-rich foods include beef, poultry, seafood, dry beans and peas, eggs, nuts, and seeds. Soy products like tofu and veggie burgers are also good sources of protein. When eating meats, choose lean or low-fat options and try to minimize deli meats and other processed meats that are high in sodium.

Blue = Dairy

This group includes milk and other dairy products that retain their calcium content, such as yogurt and cheese. Calcium-fortified soy milk is also included in the dairy group. Besides providing calcium, dairy products are important sources of vitamin D and protein. Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium and use it for healthy bones and teeth.

Serve low-fat or nonfat milk and dairy products to kids over 2 years old.

Oils: No Longer on the Guide

Oils were included in the Food Guide Pyramid because of the essential nutrients they provide, but you won't find them on the plate. Still, it's important to know about oils, which are fats that are liquid at room temperature.

Most oils (like cooking oils, such as olive oil, corn oil, or canola oil, and oil-rich foods like nuts, olives, and avocados) are high in what's considered "good" fats: monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fats. These fats raise (good) HDL cholesterol, which helps prevent heart problems, and maintain healthy levels of (bad) LDL cholesterol, which can lead to heart problems if elevated. It's good to incorporate a small amount of these types of oils into your diet.

On the other hand, solid fats (like butter, shortening, and margarine) contain more saturated fats and/or trans fats ("bad fats") than most oils, and should be limited. Some oils, including coconut oil and hydrogenated oils, are high in saturated or trans fats and are considered solid fats. Consuming large amounts of saturated and trans fats has been shown to raise LDL cholesterol levels in the blood and increase the risk for heart disease.

Customize Your Plate

MyPlate should be seen as a guide for healthy eating, and not a one-size-fits-all solution for everybody. Depending on a child's need, some food groups will need to be increased and others decreased. Talk to your health care provider to find out what's best for your kids.

The USDA's website offers food suggestions and tips, portion guidelines by age, and interactive tools to help you make MyPlate yours. Visit online at ChooseMyPlate.gov. [Please note: By clicking on this link, you will be leaving our site.]

Reviewed by: Mary L. Gavin, MD
Date reviewed: July 2014



Related Resources

Web SiteMyPlate Kids' Page This portion of the ChooseMyPlate.gov site offers a Blast Off game for kids, coloring pages, and posters.
Web SiteChooseMyPlate.gov ChooseMyPlate.gov provides practical information on how to follow the U.S. government's Dietary Guidelines for Americans. It includes resources and tools to help families lead healthier lives.
Web SiteMyPlate for Moms MyPlate for Moms tailors the USDA's food guide to suit the individual needs of pregnant and nursing women.
OrganizationU.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) The USDA works to enhance the quality of life for people by supporting the production of agriculture.


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Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

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