How to Give an Insulin Injection

Print this page Bookmark and Share
Parents

1. Get the supplies you'll need:Lea este articulo

  • insulin bottle
  • syringe
  • alcohol swabs
  • container for the used syringe

2. Wash your hands.

3. Check the insulin bottle to make sure it hasn't expired.

4. Remove the lid from the insulin bottle.

5. Wipe the rubber top of the bottle with an alcohol swab.

6. Remove the cap from the syringe.

Note: This information is for educational purposes only. For specific guidance on giving an insulin injection, talk with your doctor.

Pull air into the syringe by pulling back on the plunger until its black tip is even with the line showing the dose you'll need.

Note: This information is for educational purposes only. For specific guidance on giving an insulin injection, talk with your doctor.

Push the needle through the rubber top of the bottle.

Note: This information is for educational purposes only. For specific guidance on giving an insulin injection, talk with your doctor.

Push the plunger so that the air goes from the syringe into the bottle.

Note: This information is for educational purposes only. For specific guidance on giving an insulin injection, talk with your doctor.

Turn the insulin bottle and syringe upside down. To pull insulin into the syringe, slowly pull back on the plunger until the top of its black tip is even with the line showing your dose.

Note: This information is for educational purposes only. For specific guidance on giving an insulin injection, talk with your doctor.

The most common places to inject insulin are the abdomen (belly), the back of the upper arms, the upper buttocks, and the outer thighs. Choose a place to make the injection, and wipe the skin with an alcohol swab.

Note: This information is for educational purposes only. For specific guidance on giving an insulin injection, talk with your doctor.

Gently pinch the skin. Hold the syringe at a 90-degree angle to the skin, and push the needle all the way in.

Note: This information is for educational purposes only. For specific guidance on giving an insulin injection, talk with your doctor.

Let go of the pinched skin, and slowly push the plunger to inject all of the insulin. Wait about 5 seconds before pulling out the needle. Don't just put the used syringe in the trash. Instead, put it in a plastic or metal container with a tight lid. When the container is full, be sure the lid is closed and put it in the trash.

Reviewed by: Steven Dowshen, MD
Date reviewed: August 2013

Note: This information is for educational purposes only. For specific guidance on giving an insulin injection, talk with your doctor.



Related Resources

OrganizationAmerican Diabetes Association (ADA) The ADA website includes news, information, tips, and recipes for people with diabetes.
Web SiteJoslin Diabetes Center The website of this Boston-based center has information about how to monitor blood sugar and manage diabetes.
OrganizationJuvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International (JDRF) JDRF's mission is to find a cure for diabetes and its complications through the support of research.


Related Articles

Blood Glucose Record If your child has diabetes, you can use this printable sheet to record his or her blood glucose levels.
Definition: Insulin Injections Although researchers are testing other ways to give insulin, it's only available now in a form that must be injected just under the skin.
Hyperglycemia and Diabetic Ketoacidosis When blood glucose levels (also called blood sugar levels) are too high, it's called hyperglycemia. A major goal in controlling diabetes is to keep blood sugar levels as close to the desired range as possible.
Helping Kids Deal With Injections and Blood Tests Blood tests and insulin injections can be a challenge for kids with diabetes and their parents. Here are some strategies for coping with these necessary procedures.
Medicines for Diabetes Whether your child is taking insulin or pills (or both) to control diabetes, it's important to learn how diabetes medicines work and how much your child should be taking.
Diabetes Center Does your child have type 1 or type 2 diabetes? Learn how to manage the disease and keep your child healthy.
Hypoglycemia When blood glucose levels drop too low, it's called hypoglycemia. Very low blood sugar levels can cause severe symptoms that require immediate treatment.
Diabetes Facts and Myths If your child has diabetes, it's important to educate yourself so you can help manage it. This means arming yourself with the right information.




Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

© 1995-2014 KidsHealth® All rights reserved.
Images provided by iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart.com



 

Upcoming Events

Sponsored by families with ASD, it's the 10th Annual Autism Friendly Halloween Party

Voyage on the Parkway: a fun event for families with preschool aged children.

Wear a red shirt and join community partners walking from Our Lady of the Rosary School to the Kroc Center

Child car seat safety check by certified technicians

View full event calendarView full event calendar

Health and Safety

Your child's health and safety is our top priority

Accreditations

The Children's Medical Center of Dayton Dayton Children's
The Right Care for the Right Reasons

One Children's Plaza - Dayton, Ohio - 45404-1815
937-641-3000
www.childrensdayton.org