How Can I Tell if a Cut Needs Stitches?

Print this page Bookmark and Share
Parents

How can I tell if my child needs stitches for a cut?
- Andrea

Between the playground, sports, and the rough-and-tumble of everyday life, kids end up with bruises, scrapes, and cuts from time to time. While many can be treated with some disinfectant and a bandage, it's important to know when a cut might need medical attention or even a few stitches.

Get medical attention for a cut that:

  • is still bleeding after you apply pressure for 5 minutes
  • is gaping or wide
  • appears to be deep
  • is on your child's face or neck
  • contains glass or other debris
  • has an object sticking out of it, such as a twig
  • spurts blood

If a cut is spurting blood, it may be because an artery has been nicked. The wound should be treated and stitched immediately so that its edges can come together and heal properly.

A common concern with cuts is whether a tetanus shot is necessary. A child who has not had a tetanus shot within the last 5 years might need one to protect against infection. A child may also need a shot if the wound was caused by rusty metal, is contaminated with dirt or saliva, or is a bite from an animal. The tetanus shot must be given within 48 hours after the wound happened. But the sooner the shot is given, the better, as it will help to lower the risk of infection.

These guidelines can help you decide whether your child needs immediate medical attention. But ultimately, doctors in your local clinic or emergency room are the ones will know for sure whether a cut needs stitches.

Reviewed by: Steven Dowshen, MD
Date reviewed: May 2015



Related Resources

OrganizationAmerican Red Cross The American Red Cross helps prepare communities for emergencies and works to keep people safe every day. The website has information on first aid, safety, and more.
OrganizationAmerican Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) The AAP is committed to the health and well-being of infants, adolescents, and young adults. The website offers news articles and tips on health for families.


Related Articles

First Aid: Cuts Most cuts can be safely treated at home. But deeper cuts - or any wounds that won't stop bleeding - need emergency medical treatment.
Household Safety: Preventing Cuts It's important to protect kids from sharp and dangerous items around and outside the home. Here are ways to prevent cuts and other injuries.
Tetanus Tetanus (also called lockjaw) is a preventable disease that affects the muscles and nerves, usually due to a contaminated wound.
Dealing With Cuts Find out how to handle minor cuts at home - and when to seek professional treatment.




Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

© 1995-2016 KidsHealth® All rights reserved.
Images provided by iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart.com



 

Upcoming Events

K99.1FM is proud to present LOCASH and Jordan Rager at Yellow Rose on Wednesday, July 27th for the LOCASH Concert for Kids!

Car Seat Safety Check

The Annual Logan X. Hess Stop Child Abuse Poker Run will take place August 6.

Play golf at the world-class NCR Country Club golf course to benefit Dayton Children’s Pediatric Cancer Care Center. Enjoy the Hoopla festivities featuring dinner and an outstanding silent auction and a guest presentations from our brave Dayton Children's ambassador fighting cancer.

View full event calendarView more events...

Health and Safety

Your child's health and safety is our top priority

Accreditations

The Children's Medical Center of Dayton Dayton Children's
The Right Care for the Right Reasons

One Children's Plaza - Dayton, Ohio - 45404-1815
937-641-3000
www.childrensdayton.org